Fine Food Recipes!

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Postby Ken » Fri Jul 11, 2008 7:41 am

It may be delicious but I could never eat it knowing there are anchovies in the recipe. Dead anchovies = fishing bait.

Do you know if your snapper is really rockfish? In the US, they're allowed to sell red colored rockfish as red snapper. I don't know if they have similar rules in Canada.
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Postby tariesindanrie » Fri Jul 11, 2008 9:45 am

Anchovies really do add wonderful, salty flavor...but it's generally better if I don't know they're in there also. Bristly little buggers unless they're pureed.

Ken, I meant to tell you, I recently made your sauerbraten recipe, but with fresh onions, ginger puree (jar variety). Used brisket and made it in the slow cooker- about 8 hours on 'low'. Exquisite!


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Postby Ken » Fri Jul 11, 2008 9:58 am

tariesindanrie wrote:Anchovies really do add wonderful, salty flavor...but it's generally better if I don't know they're in there also. Bristly little buggers unless they're pureed.

Ken, I meant to tell you, I recently made your sauerbraten recipe, but with fresh onions, ginger puree (jar variety). Used brisket and made it in the slow cooker- about 8 hours on 'low'. Exquisite!

It's a mental thing with the anchovies. I use fish sauce and it doesn't bother me but I try not to think about what's in it.

I'm glad you enjoyed the sauerbraten. Even with the fresh ingredients, it's still simple to make.
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Postby Mark in Vancouver » Fri Jul 11, 2008 11:50 am

If I hadn't mentioned the anchovies, you wouldn't know they were in the recipe. Their proper use, IMO, is as a very subtle background flavour. Ken, you also don't like olives, so this recipe isn't for you...
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Postby Mark in Vancouver » Thu Nov 06, 2008 9:41 pm

Savoury Thai crepes with dipping sauce


This is just slobbericious. I made these for Shari when she was here, and they make an excellent side for any Thai or SE Asian meal. Tonight we'll be having them with grilled coriander/pepper chicken and spicy cucumber salad...


In a medium bowl, mix 1 cup white flour, 1/4 cup rice flour and 1/3 cup sugar.

Stir in 3/4 cups canned coconut milk and one large egg yolk. Add and stir in 1/4 cup fresh lime juice + 2 tbsps...

These are crepes, so you want the batter to be relatively runny. Add more coconut milk as necessary to get the right consistency. I use an Indian "tava" - a griddle used for making parathas. Any frying pan will do, but non-stick is a feature.

Add very small amounts of oil as necessary.

Heat a small amount of peanut (or vegetable oil) on the very hot griddle, and toss in 3 or 4 cilantro (coriander) leaves. Then quickly add 1/4 cup of the batter. Lift and move the pan to spread the batter out as thin as you can get it.

The first one is always a disaster, but when the pan is hot enough, you can flip the crepe til both sides are slightly browned. Store them as they're done in some foil in a just-warm oven. Always remember to add the cilantro leaves before the batter.


Then the dipping sauce:

2 tbsp Thai fish sauce
2 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tbsp water
1 tsp salt
1 small clove of garlic, finely minced
1 bird chile, finely minced.

Stir ingredients until the salt is dissolved.

Serve the crepes just warm. Roll them, and dip them, and become transcendent.
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Postby Graeme Robson » Sun Nov 09, 2008 2:14 pm

Sounds good but.....

1 bird chile :?:
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Postby shari2 » Sun Nov 09, 2008 2:27 pm

Ah, the birdie totally made the sauce.
I'm drooling...the crepes were lovely. I could have eaten just them...8)
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Postby Graeme Robson » Sun Nov 09, 2008 2:31 pm

Google always comes to the alter....when prayed.

cayenne pepper = finger chili = ginnie pepper = bird pepper

All is understood now.
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Postby Mark in Vancouver » Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:04 pm

Not Cayenne. Bird chilies are sometimes called Bird's Eye Chilies or Thai Dragon. Look for those very small, brilliant red jobbies you'll find in good grocery stores or Asian markets. For the sauce, one is definitely enough.
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Postby Graeme Robson » Sun Nov 09, 2008 8:30 pm

Cool! 8)

I'll keep a look out then.
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Postby Graeme Robson » Wed Nov 12, 2008 9:28 am

Black pudding

The main versions and the key ingredients are summarised below.

Black pudding - UK - pigs blood, pork fat and cereal (oatmeal and or barley)
Drisheen - Ireland - as above but with lamb's blood
Boudin noir - France - pigs blood, pork fat, breadcrumbs, brandy or calvados and cream
Morcilla - Spain - pigs blood, pork fat, paprika, cooked long grain rice, sherry and sometimes raisins
Blutwurst - Germany - pigs blood, diced bacon and lungs

Ingredients

2 litres blood
Casings, beef runners of large hog casings (optional)
3 onions, finely chopped
1 kg of suet or diced pork fat (back fat or bacon fat)
500ml double cream
500g oatmeal, soaked overnight in water)
500g barley, boiled in water for 30 minutes
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon mixed herbs or ground coriander
1 teaspoon black pepper or cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground mace

Soften the onions in a quarter of the fat, make sure that they do not colour. Add the rest of the fat and leave to slowly sweat for 10 minutes Add the oatmeal and cream and cook for a few minutes Add the rest of the ingredients and stir over a gentle heat for 5 minutes If you are using skins, these can now be filled and sealed with two knots. The puddings can then be poached in barely simmering water for 5 - 10 minutes. Splitting is common, to avoid this prick the puddings with a needle and cook on the lowest possible simmer (better to cook them very, very slowly then to lose them). Any pudding which floats to the top should also be pricked, they are cooked when brown liquid comes out. They can then be drained and kept in a fridge for 1 - 2 weeks

An easier method is to bake the pudding in an ovenproof container, and cook in a bain marie (by standing the tin in a larger tin half filled with water) in a low oven (160 degree or gas mark 2) for 1 - 2 hours until the mixture is firm to the touch Make sure that the mixture has started to thicken and coat your stirring spoon (as with a custard) before pouring into the container and stir well first (this should ensure that the ingredients are evenly mixed)

You can then cut slices and fry or bake
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Postby Mark in Vancouver » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:49 pm

Mmmmmm....
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Postby Graeme Robson » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:57 pm

Mark in Vancouver wrote:Mmmmmm....


Which type of Mmmmmm?
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Postby Mark in Vancouver » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:59 pm

The type that goes in for a nice bit of sausage, some fried tomatoes, and toast.
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Postby Graeme Robson » Wed Nov 12, 2008 2:00 pm

I'm there!! 8)
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